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How to Sew a French Seam | Sewing Machine

49 Comments


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Hi, I’m Jennifer from Workroom Social, and today I’m going to show you how to make a French seam. We have our two pieces of fabric here that we want to sew together, and we want to sew this with a French seam.

To get a good idea of what that would look like, we should identify a wrong side of the fabric. Here we have our two wrong sides. Now, this is one of the few things that you will sew with wrong sides together. So you want to take your two X’s and match them up, and then you are going to sew a narrow seam allowance. We are going to sew about a quarter of an inch. I’m just lining up my fabric with the outside of my presser foot, and that’s about a quarter of an inch, and then you’re just going to sew a straight stitch, and I’m on a 2.5 mm stitch length.

Then after you sew the wrong sides together, you want to press this seam flat. You don’t need to iron it, but if you just finger press this to get the seam to open a little bit, then that helps this side lie a little bit flatter. Now what we’re going to do is we’re going to take some scissors and we’re going to trim away about an eighth of an inch from the seam allowance, so we’re cutting the seam allowance in half.

Now is the time that we’re going to sew right sides together. So with our right sides facing us, we’re going to lay right sides together, and we are going to do our best to push out this seam so it’s nice and flat. Grab some pins. You can pin it in place to hold it. We have our seam all pinned into place, so now it’s time to sew.

Before we do that though, you should think about your seam allowance, so I’m going to do my total seam allowance is 5/8th of an inch, which is a very common seam allowance, and we sewed the first narrow seam at a quarter of an inch, so 5/8ths minus a quarter is 3/8ths, so to get the total 5/8ths, right now I need to take this back to the sewing machine, and sew a 3/8ths seam allowance. I’m going to line up my fabric with that 3/8ths marker that is on my seam guide, and I’m just going to sew a straight stitch following that guide.

Then when you’re done, you can take this to the ironing board, and you’re going to press your seam to one side because they can’t open anymore. Our french seam encloses the raw edge within this bit. This is the right side of our fabric, and then this is the wrong side of our fabric with our French seam.

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49 Comments

  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    TC J

    I use French Seams whenever I have the chance. French seams makes everything you sew look amazing, and more professional. You clothing last longer due to the seams being reinforced. You simply can't buy clothes off the rack with French Seams…you can only find French Seams in haute cou·ture. If you've ever slipped into, put on, or pulled on something made with French Seams, you can feel the difference in construction and quality. It's almost like putting on clothing that has a pillow case on the inside. Like the garment is all one piece. Of course they look wonderful when pressed during construction and considered in your seam allowance. Thanks for sharing your knowledge!

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Donna Woodford

    What's the purpose of a French seam?

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Lori England

    Thank you for your video. I had never heard the term French seam. I now know what I called flat felled seam is really similar to the French seam.

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    amy hall

    To save fabric, why wouldn't the first seam be 1/4? no trimming.

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Karla Downunder

    Um why would you sew and cut, just sew a smaller seam allowance, this makes an unnecessary step..

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    KataGan

    Wonderful explaination. I like starting with a 1/4 seam too and then do a 3/8. But I think you could skip trimming the first seam down to 1/8. I also like to sew the finished seam down on the inside.

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    clelia schwindt

    Why do an 1/4 "when you later are going to cut if??? Sorry, that is not a French seam.

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    OnezumiDaisuke

    Wow, I just watched a video yesterday that mentioned a French seam, then this popped up today. Turns out, I've been undoing these on Indian tops for about 8 years, lol! Thanks, this was helpful. 🙂

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Ruby Wood

    French seams without Ironing!

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    stacy longwebb

    That sewing machine is sooooooo loud..!!!

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Ces Fab

    1:51am and i'm watching how to sew a french seam. how did i arrive here?

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    alfonso maria Ferraioli

    Hello do you think is it possible to make a french Sean in a tight corner angle? Thank you.

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Monelle Richmond

    Love your videos, but you are making it difficult for both yourself and for us by using a fabric that looks the same on both sides.

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    small footprint

    I'm just getting back to sewing after years away, so it's helpful to see these demonstrations.

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Bree Harrison

    Good to know I was doing this correctly. Thanks for giving super clear instructions. 😊

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    kimcase9

    Ohhhhhhhhh hunny… service your machine..it is in dire need of an oiling…is grinding bad… you can do… just open top and use handwheel.. anything that moves squirt with wd 40… Avoid the belt…

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Susie

    Nice and simple tutorial. Thank you.

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Natalie Bourgeois

    Doing my first french seam now!

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    V YH

    OMG… A for effort, BUT not at all a good learning source.

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Eve Paludan

    I cannot imagine doing French seams without ironing everything.

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Mark McCombs

    Thank you.

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    TisEyerish1

    I think there could be three improvements to these instructions…
    1) Use a fabric that is printed on one side only, so that it would be easier to distinguish the right side from the left side
    2) The seam should be ironed, rather than taking the lazy way out, as shown in this video. It does make a difference.
    3) The straight pins should have been placed vertically, rather than horizontally, so that they could be left in place during machine sewing. It's a small thing, but it does make a difference when working with long seams, e.g., draft-stoppers for doors.

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    ak bunny

    Great tutorial, many thanks……

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Arlene Wi

    Awesome, I'm having an issue, I'm sewing a canvas tote bag, but the seams inside are not neat, how can I cover them, even if the 2 sides of the bag are sew up already?

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Farida Creation

    T

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Walter Messines

    Watching it again to learn about the French seam. The first round was just watching your face.

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Enlightened Needs

    Thank you so very much for sharing this!

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    The Otaku Girl

    Hi Ali

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Jesus First To-the-Point End Time Signs

    Thank you for this video! Very helpful and great presentation! Can you please give me an example as to when a french seam would be used? Thank you so much and God bless! – Tina

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Just Somebody

    Great ! Thanks alot know i know how to do it at school !

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    577 Jersey Customs Adventures

    Welding for women 🙂

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Don Baker

    A Very helpful video and nicely stepped out. Efficient, clear and simple. Thank you.

    But I have to say, I couldn't believe it when all of a sudden you started talking "Inches". WHAT??

    Modern America, still working in inches!! 5/8"s, 3/8"s ?? No Way!!! I haven't had to convert from inches since 1978. I started my working life in Fine Limit Sheet Metal in 1978. Even THEN we worked in Decimal inches. 0.001.

    So funny to see someone in the modern world talking with all seriousness in Inches. It's like reading a book from primary school.

    Come on US. Get with it.

    Millimetres.
    Centimetres.
    Metres.
    Kilometres.

    No one else in the world uses that old system anymore.

    And please see the correct spelling when you get there.

    A "Meter" is equipment for measurement. A Metre IS a measurement.

    Make the change for the better, and see how simple life can be. Everyone else did.

    With love and support for you all.

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    cannibal_cat

    Agh, I needed this to hep me with clothes making. Thank you so much, it's a really straightforward tutorial!

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    A.K. Foster

    Contrasting fabric would have made this so much more understandable.

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    The Home Plate Special

    Looks neat. Most ppl I have ever watched demonstrate their sewing techniques put a couple of back stitches at the beginning and end of the stitch run on the sewing machine by turning the wheel opposite for a moment so the back stitches help to hold the seam thread from unraveling at the borders or ends / edges. I noticed this was not done here so is that only for certain types of seams? You just snipped your thread off right at the edge.

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Palpal Lama

    I love ur work

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Palpal Lama

    Beautiful girl sewing febric beautifully keep it up

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Hiral Mehta

    Fabric name plz?

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Vijaya Gauri

    Thank you. This technique gives a very neat finish.

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    SHAWN BOND

    when do you sew a french seam vs a flat felled seam?

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Θα το ράψεις επιτέλους;

    thank you for this tutorial! I started to watch it, but i could not take my eyes off your beautiful face lines! Back to tutorial now, this technique is making the side seams voluminous, doesn't it? Could we topstitching them? And the last question. What fabric you are using here?

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Marias Cakery

    Excellent tutorial, I did my first French seam after watching this video with no problems.

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    honeycheek

    very well explained& demonstrated, thank you!

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Sy's Retoucherie

    in France we call English seam

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    The Pink Frog

    Sew easy to understand! Thank you so very much for sharing this!

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Anelise Hoffman

    Great tutorial! Thank you!

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Dianna A

    Why not use contrasting fabric. Less confusing on such a simple tutorial

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Yamgml Beacham

    Very easy to understand and follows ,great lesson .
    Cheers 👍😀

    Reply
  • July 3, 2020 at 5:18 am
    Jijiloki

    this is the best howcast channel becuase ive already done of my homework and the video is very good in hd

    Reply

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